Dogwood Flower Sculpture

Here is an in-progress shot of a spray of dogwood flowers I am sculpting:

This sculpture is an art piece of my own (a rare non-commissioned piece), which I have been nibbling away at for a few months now. I had hoped to complete it before Christmas, but there are many competing interests at this time of year, so it may have to wait.

Here are a few more pics:

In this last photo, I am undercutting the flowers to make them appear to float above the background. I intend to frame this piece in a shadow box with a black background.

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DeWitte Family Crest

So many of my clients become friends, which I hope for because it means my carving adds meaning to their lives.

The DeWitte family have become some of our very best friends after they called me on a recommendation from the President of the Central Fraser Valley Woodcarvers Club. Jack is an amateur historian and a very good one. He knows his family history and he knows heraldry. This family crest, with helmet (those are feathers coming out of the top), shield, lions, castle towers, and surrounded by acanthus leaves, is historically accurate for the DeWitte family.

The wood is walnut, and is carved not deeper than one quarter of an inch, which means that all the depth you see is an illusion. It utilizes light and shadow to give the impression that there is more depth than in reality.

I feel privileged to work for true lovers of this art and craft like the DeWittes. And even more pleased to call them friends!

If you are interested in having something similar carved for your family, please email me at gvmcmillan@gmail.com

Rifle Stock Carving

I get some very interesting carving commissions! That’s what I love about this work – there’s no getting stale because someone is always asking me to carve something creative and challenging.

This latest commission is for a rifle stock. The wood is walnut, and the carving is to match a tattoo! How cool is that?

Trout Carving 

Here are a couple of fat little trout that I carved for a client in the Okanagan valley. These fellas are going on the face of a fishing cabinet.

After cutting them out I used a nice little carving jig to hold them in place while I carved them with my mallet and gouges.

In the pictures and videos below you can see more of the progress and the stain selection. I received great service from Michelle Sparrow and her paint store North Langley Paint & Decorating when she advised me on stain selection and application as well as a good clear coat to spray.


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Cougar Carving Completed

Finally!


You say, “It’s about time, Grant. You’ve been dragging this carving out forever…”

True. I’ve started and stopped and finished and restarted this carving a few times. But now it is finished, mounted in a hand-carved frame, and is hanging on my wall.

It is a rare opportunity to buy something that wasn’t carved on a commission for someone else. I manage to squeeze in a carving of my own maybe once a year. The rest of the time I am carving items that others have requested from me. For example, my next projects include a box for an urn, a cross for a collector, a large sign for the Pacific Woods Lodge at Camp Qwanoes, a relief carving of a fireman’s helmet, a sign for a cabin, a lintel above a grand entry set of doors, and a large cross for a chapel. All this will easily take me into next year.

Relief Carving Classes

One of the things I love about woodcarving is how many people are interested in learning it. In my other life at university, I teach a few courses every year and I find teaching to be something I love. Teaching carving classes is also something I do quite often and I find a lot of fulfillment in watching students get excited as they think about the endless possibilities of carving.

Recently, I have taught two different types of carving classes. The first was a lettering class at Lee Valley Tools in Coquitlam. In that class, we learned some basic principles of lettering – such as what is a serif? We didn’t dwell on this part, but moved on quickly to learn how light and shadow works for letters and how important it is to have tools that match the  curves of the letters. We learned that a 60 degree incised angle can be difficult to cut but it can make a large difference to the look of the letters. We learned that it is important to “give the wood a place to go or it will find its own way” and so we started each letter with stab cuts in the middle of the letter. Then we also learned how much easier it is to cut the serifs before cutting the rest of the letters. The students went home with a completed project and some ideas for how to apply their new-found carving skills to other carpentry projects.

The second class was an introductory relief carving class which I taught at our club location – the Central Fraser Valley Woodcarvers Club. We meet at Yale Secondary School in Abbotsford on Wednesday nights.

Relief Carving Class Brochure

What I found most interesting was how much the students seemed to take to carving with large gouges hit with a mallet. They learned just how easy it is to control a carving gouge with a mallet and how fine details can be cut by light taps with a mallet on the tools. We also learned how every carving gouge can cut a circle and how much difference it makes to use a slicing action when carving by hand. My goal is to show the students how to finish a carving right from the gouge, with no sandpaper needed. This method of carving is quite quick, and with the correct techniques and some artistic vision, can create a unique piece of artwork that shows the individual carver skill. I compare this to a painter whose brushstrokes set him or her apart from every other artist. The marks left by the carver show the skill of the carver, the sharpness of the tools, and are what shows the uniqueness of each woodcarver.

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No sandpaper was used on these relief carvings!

 

If you are interested in taking a course, contact me by email at gvmcmillan(at)gmail.com

 

Herald Angels or Heraldry?

It has been quiet on this site but not because it has been quiet in my carving studio! It had been crazy busy with carving work such that I have neglected you, my loyal readers! 

The Christmas season always sneaks up on me and I have to be careful not to overcommit. Must leave time to sing “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” and other Christmas carols.

Some projects I am working on include a blanket ladder with dovetail joinery. 


It isn’t really carving work, per se, but I wanted to show old Roubo that his rants about carvers being imprecise are misplaced. I was building furniture and doing complex joinery long before I picked up a carving tool. 

I carved two other pieces that I have done before: a lettercarving piece (the first photo above) and a stylized acanthus leaf in relief. 

And on the heraldry front, I am working on a large family crest that is getting close to being finished. The short video below shows some progress. 


Stay tuned for more updates. I have a very large lettercarving project that I am on the verge of starting. In the new year I am picking up the wood for an ornately carved lintel over a front door in a large foyer. And I have another family crest in the works. It’s nice to have work, but I am feeling the pressure to get things completed! 

Trout Carving in High Relief

Inspired by a painting done of me and for me by my good friend and artist, Len Schmidt, a while back I carved a trout out of pine, in high relief. The idea was to test out several artistic concepts. I wanted it to be a minimalist type of carving – no scales, just a hint at the eyes and gills – but I also wanted it to give the impression of a fish that is half-in and half-out of the water, and one that clearly has some movement going on. It hang on my wall straight up and down for about a year, and I wasn’t happy with it.

Then, recently I thought about grouping some of the art I have on my office walls, and I decided to put this carving next the painting that inspired it. I also decided to hang it at an angle to create more visual interest. The twist of the tail and the curve of the tail fin show so much more like this. I like it a lot better!


I’m still not particularly happy with the carving overall, but I’ll chalk it up to experimentation and learning. As a result, it’s not for sale. Someday I’ll redo it and resolve the issues I have with it and then I’ll consider selling it. Until then, I hope you can enjoy it for what it is.

 

Acanthus Leaf Study

Finished Acanthus Leaf

I call this relief carving “Acanthus Leaf Study” because it is the one I use as a model to teach introductory woodcarving classes. It has all the elements of a classic low relief sculpture. It has a level foundation, some high sides, some low, some slopes, deep vees, undercuts and undulations. It has curves like Venus de Milo and is evocative of Ancient Greek and Roman sculptures. It throws a lovely shadow and will gradually warm to an antique shade over time.

Unfinished Acanthus Leaf

It is carved in Aspen wood. The dimensions are 6 inches by 4 inches, by 3/4 inches thick. It is signed as an original with my brand initials.

Owned by a private collector.

Van Dyk Family Crest

Van Dyk Crest

The Van Dyk family crest carving is now complete. I carved it in a solid piece of yellow pine, approximately 8.5″ x 11″ and 3/4 of an inch thick. It is finished in two coats of Danish wax oil, and hand rubbed to a warm glow. This will hopefully be a family heirloom.

This was a commission from a local realtor friend. Contact me if you would like something similar. I have access to heraldry records for your family name (as long as you have an official crest).

Update. Here is a comment from the client:

“Hey Grant !!! Wow the crest looks even better in person… What a fantastic craftsman you are!!!!! I’m going to hug you next time I see you be prepared…
It will be a Christmas gift and I’m certain the Van Dyk family will Love it For generations to come…..
Thanks Grant!”