Van Dyk Family Crest

Van Dyk Crest

The Van Dyk family crest carving is now complete. I carved it in a solid piece of yellow pine, approximately 8.5″ x 11″ and 3/4 of an inch thick. It is finished in two coats of Danish wax oil, and hand rubbed to a warm glow. This will hopefully be a family heirloom.

This was a commission from a local realtor friend. Contact me if you would like something similar. I have access to heraldry records for your family name (as long as you have an official crest).

Update. Here is a comment from the client:

“Hey Grant !!! Wow the crest looks even better in person… What a fantastic craftsman you are!!!!! I’m going to hug you next time I see you be prepared…
It will be a Christmas gift and I’m certain the Van Dyk family will Love it For generations to come…..
Thanks Grant!”
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Published by

Grant McMillan

I am the University Registrar at Trinity Western University, and I've been in the profession since 1997. I have an MA in Organizational Leadership, and have made a career of going into organizations that are in very difficult situations and leading them to a much better place. I teach Leadership to budding managers in the Adult Degree Completion program at Trinity Western University. I speak and consult, with organizations. Contact me at grant.mcmillan@twu.ca

2 thoughts on “Van Dyk Family Crest”

  1. Hi Grant – I am looking for a family crest like this for my new home – the last name is O’Reilly. The crest features a bloody hand with heraldic lions on either side. Is this something you might be interested in doing for me? I’m thinking it should be 10″ x 10″, or something like that. What do you suppose you might charge for such work?

    Many thanks!

    Terry O’Reilly

    1. Hi Terry – I carve family crests often, and I would be interested in doing this for you. 10×10 is quite small to carve much detail in. Thinks like the lions toes, eyes, teeth & tongues tend to disappear at that size. I would recommend that it be no smaller than at least 18×18. The price depends on quite a few factors. What kind of wood are you looking for? How much detail, and do you want it to be painted or clear-coated? The smaller size increases the cost because it increases the difficulty and the need for micro-tools and magnifying lenses.
      Grant

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