Bishop’s Crozier & Pectoral Cross

A few weeks ago I was contacted by an Anglican minister who was going to be installed as a Bishop and was looking for a few items to be made for the ceremony. He wanted a Bishop’s Crozier and a Pectoral Cross, both with Celtic themes. Not being an Anglican I was unfamiliar with these terms and had to do some research. Based on the research I made a few proposals which he kindly helped me to refine. After giving me the go-ahead on the carving I had some difficulties finding the right materials for the job. Finding straight grained Black Walnut of decent length is harder than I thought. After scouring all the local (and not-so-local) hardwood lumber shops with no luck I remembered my dad had a length of it in his shop. I hoped it was straight-grained, as he was pretty picky about his wood. I found the chunk of 2″ by 8″ by 4 ft length had 3 feet of length that would suffice, which was a huge sigh of relief. But finding the right kind of ash was much, much easier, fortunately.

I started by glueing up a few pieces of the walnut to make the shepherd’s crook. I needed to join the pieces in such a way as to make the crook stronger, as any end-grain would be prone to breaking. Then I drew up a shape that looked pleasing to my eye and appeared to be traditional, which the client was looking for.

Shepherd's Crook Cutout
Shepherd’s Crook Cutout

Then I shaped the crook with a rasp until it looked like this.

Shepherd's Crook Shaped
Shepherd’s Crook Shaped

After this, I got to work with my table saw, cutting the walnut into two 3 foot lengths and then rounding them with a spoke shave and hand plane. Of course, you remember that the longest straight-grained walnut I could get was 3 feet, so I had to join two lengths together. I did that by inserting cane couplers from Lee Valley Tools into the end-grain. I used my drill press and some epoxy glue for the task. It proved to be a little tricky to get them to be straight!

Spokeshavings
Spokeshavings
Crozier Shafts Rounded
Crozier Shafts Rounded

 

Crozier Shaft Joinery
Crozier Shaft Joinery

After rough-sanding everything, I got down to carving a Celtic cross into the shaft of the Crozier. I’ve rarely done relief carvings “in the round” so to speak, so that proved a little interesting. I drew the cross onto the shaft and then clamped the shaft in my vise and worked on a section before rotating the shaft to work around the bend. Setting the right depths was important, especially working around the shaft. But in the end it worked out and I couldn’t wait to test a little patch with my favourite oil & wax finish.

Oiling the Celtic Cross
Oiling the Celtic Cross

Finally, after sanding through several grits of sand-paper, and down to 400 grit wet-dry paper, I oiled the entire project and immediately fell in love with it. This is the moment I wait for every time I carve something. It just pops. But that’s just my opinion. Take a look at this next picture and tell me what you think:

Crozier drying
Crozier drying
Detail of Celtic Cross
Detail of Celtic Cross

Finally, I worked on the Pectoral Cross, which is a cross the Bishop wears on his chest. This was fairly easy, as I’ve carved numerous Celtic crosses in the recent past. The biggest challenge of this carving was stopping all the little bits from breaking off. In the end, I had to find a happy medium between enough depth so you can see the carving, but not so deep as to have parts break off.

Pectoral Cross
Pectoral Cross

I had the opportunity to meet the client and deliver the carvings in person, which is a real joy. And as a bonus, I also was able to meet his wife and daughter. Meeting clients adds so much to the experience for me. The connection between maker and receiver is one of those intangibles that makes my work important to me. It is something you can’t get at the cash register in the big box home decor store.

Grant

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